Very accomodating


11-Apr-2020 11:43

Your Detour To A Stress-Free Life How To Bounce Back Better Of course, knowing when to say is also important.

In a 2012 survey of employers by the job placement firm OI Partners, being a team player -- as in, flexible and helpful -- was the top-valued quality in an employee. A 2011 study found that couples who reported a high level of generosity in their relationship were five times more likely to say their marriage was very happy.

If you're someone who occasionally finds it hard to do the latter, well, join the club. At work, our responsibilities are ever-expanding (thanks, never-ending recession), and at home, we feel pressed to help stretched-thin friends and family.

"In this age of constant electronic connectedness, requests are coming at us every waking hour, making it even more important to be able to put your foot down," says Roni Cohen-Sandler, Ph D, a clinical psychologist in Weston, Connecticut.

And sometimes just saying yes is the easiest way out (see: placating a demanding mother-in-law). Other research finds that when we do things for other people, our brains light up in areas associated with pleasure and reward.

Given this, it's not always easy to know when a firm is in order. The most obvious sign you're too accommodating: Saying yes makes you feel bad.

A self assessment form and a map showing the location of the schemes are also included.

The staff helped decorate the room, had the pizza right on time and made everything run smoothly.

"And in our culture, women get the message that saying no is tantamount to being difficult, so we're often not able to say no unless we're at the end of our rope." Bowing out pay off, notes Rego: "Putting your foot down more often lowers stress and improves your confidence and well-being." Follow these simple guidelines to knowing when, and how, to make the most of this sanity-saving two-letter word.